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Harvard Referencing: Image

This guide shows students and staff how to reference using the Harvard Referencing style.

Images/Illustrations in a Book

In some cases you may want to refer to an illustration, image or photo in a book or to the information in the caption.  Treat these just as you would use written text.  The following example is of an unnamed piece of sixties art, which has a strong reference back to the drawings of Aubrey Beardsley. 

In-text citation:

The mid 1960s saw a revivial of interest in, and reference back to, artwork from the end of the previous century, for example the drawings of Aubrey Beardsley (Gorman 2001, p. 69).

Reference list:

Gorman, P. 2001, The look: adventures in pop & rock fashion, Sanctuary Publishing Ltd, London.

An Image on the Internet

An image that has an author/creator and date:

In-text citation:

Some of the excitement and alarm that rail travel caused are captured by Turner (1844) in his painting of the Great Western Railway. 

Reference list:

Turner, J. 1844, Rain, steam, and speed - The Great Western Railway, oil on canvas, National Gallery Picture Library, Retrieved: 28 January ,2009, from
http://www.nationalgalleryimages.co.uk/.

An image that has no author/creator and no date:

In-text citation:

This photograph captures the varieties of green in the grass (Aero grass n.d.).

Reference list:

Aero grass, n.d., photograph, Neo Smart Image Gallery, Retrieved: 28 January, 2009, from
http://neosmart.net/gallery/v/wallpapers/Vista/LH/Aero+Grass.jpg.html.

An Artwork Reproduced - Not an Original

This can be an artwork (painting, photo, sculpture, building, design, installation etc) reproduced in a book or article or video. 

In-text citation:

Both Picasso's The three musicians (Arnason 1978, p. 337), were painted in 1921.   

Reference list:

Arnason, H. 1978, A history of modern art, Thames and Hudson,  London.

Points to remember:

  • always write the name of the artwork in italics
  • place the citation details in brackets immediately after the name of the artwork
  • do not refer to the artwork in the Reference List/Bibliography, just the source

An Original Artwork You Have Viewed

You may have seen an original artwork (painting, photo, sculpture, building, dress, design, installation etc) at an exhibition, gallery, fashion show, museum, personal collection etc and would like to reference it.  This is not something from a catalogue, magazine, book or an image on the Internet.  In the text and in the reference list the artist/creator takes the place of the author. 

In-text citation:

Epigram (Hardy Amies 1960) is typical of cocktail dresses of that period.     

A very colourful vase belonging to that period is Plique a jour (Gustav Gaudernack c. 1907).

OR

Reference list:

Amies, H. 1960, Epigram, cocktail dress, Victoria and Albert Museum, London.

Gaudernack, G. c. 1907, Plique a jour, enamelled vase, Kunstindustrimuseet, Oslo.

Points to remember:

  • place the author/creator/designer and date in brackets straight after the name of the artwork in the text
  • the format for the bibliography/reference list is: Artist Year, Title, type of work, Museum or Gallery, City.
  • use italics for the title of the work itself
© Box Hill Institute RTO: 4687 CRICOS: 02411J