Skip to main content

Harvard Referencing: Figures/Tables

This guide shows students and staff how to reference using the Harvard Referencing style.

Figures & Graphs

Figures include diagrams and all types of graphs. An image, photo, illustration or screenshot displayed for scientific purposes is classed as a figure.

All figures in your paper must be referred to in the main body of the text. At the bottom of the figure is the title, explaining what the figure is showing and the legend, i.e. an explanation of what the symbols, acronyms or colours mean.

In-text citation:

The in-text reference is placed beneath the legend and title with the heading 'Figure' and starts with a sequential figure number (e.g. Figure 1, Figure 2). 

eg. 
GRAPH 1. PHYSICAL PRODUCTION, selected commodities, Australia, 2010-11 to 2015-16

Figure 1: PHYSICAL PRODUCTION, selected commodities, Australia, 2010-11 to 2015-16 (Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics 2017)

If the source is from a book or journal (print or electronic) or from a web document with page numbers, add the page number to the in-text citation. 

If the figure is altered in any way from the original source, add 'Modified from source', eg.

(Modified from source: Australian Bureau of Statistics 2017)

In main text:

Production of sugar in Australia was estimated at 34 million tonnes in 2015-16 (Figure 1). 

Reference list:

References should be listed in the Harvard Referencing Style according to format. 

eg. 

Australian Bureau of Statistics 2017, Crops and plantations, Retrieved: 24 February, 2018 from http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/Latestproducts/4632.0.55.001Main%20Features302015-16?opendocument&tabname=Summary&prodno=4632.0.55.001&issue=2015-16&num=&view=

 

Tables

Tables are numerical values or text displayed in rows and columns.

In-text citation:

Each table should be displayed with a brief explanatory title at the top. 

Number all tables in the order they appear in the text.

e.g.

Table 27.4 Immunity to selected bacterial infections

Infection Pathogenesis Major Defence Mechanism
Diptheria Toxin Neutralising antibody
Cholera Enterotoxin

IgA blocking adhesion in gut

Neutralising antibody

Meningitis Bacteraemia, meningitis Antibody and complement aid phagocytosis, kill bacteria by Iysis
Staphylococcus aureus Locally invasive, toxic in skin Antibody and complement aid phagocytosis, bacteria killed by phagocytes
Tuberculosis Survives within macrophages Macrophage activation by T-cell cytokine

(Source: Knox et al. 2014, p. 669.)

If the table is altered in any way from the original source, add 'Modified from source'.

eg.

(Modified from source: Knox et al. 2014, p. 669.)

In main text:

Some bacteria, like those that cause tuberculosis, have evolved the means of surviving and living within phagocytic macrophages (Table 27.4). 

OR

As Table 27.4 shows, some bacteria, like those that cause tuberculosis, have evolved the means of surviving and living within phagocytic macrophages. 

Reference list:

References should be listed in the Harvard Referencing Style according to format. 

eg. 

Knox, B., Ladiges, P., Evans, B. & Saint, R. 2014, Biology: an Australian focus, 5th edn, McGraw-Hill Education, North Ryde, NSW.

Note:

If there are four or more authors of the figure or table, use the name of the first author plus et al. in the in-text citation eg.  (Leeders et al. 2009, p.34). Include the names of all authors in the reference list. 
 
© Box Hill Institute RTO: 4687 CRICOS: 02411J